Counting Bureaucrats

Table 18 to the 2016 Superintendent’s Annual Report details “Administrative, Service, and Support Personnel Positions by Function” for each division (as well as for Governor’s Schools and other specialized programs).  The items in the report clearly are budget categories but I’ve not been able to locate the definitions.

For the graphs below, I have extracted the total numbers of positions for Richmond, the State, and the peer cities of Hampton, Newport News, and Norfolk, as well as Charles City, Lynchburg, and poor Petersburg.  I’ve expressed those data as percentages of the end of year enrollments (“Average Daily Membership” or “ADM” in bureaucratese) and as percentages of the numbers of  teaching positions

To start: “Administrative.”  Here we see Richmond with fewer administrators per student and per teacher vs. the state average while the peer cities are near that average, but Petersburg and Charles City have lots of bureaucrats.  Fat lot of good that has done for Petersburg.

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Next, “Technical and Clerical.”  Here, everybody is close to the average except for Hampton and, again, Petersburg.

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Whatever “Instructional Support” may be, the peer cities are beating Richmond’s SOL performance with fewer positions; Richmond is doing poorly with well more than the state average number of positions, and Petersburg . . .

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Richmond has a lot of “Other Professional” positions, whatever those are.  Charles City has a lot more.

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Next, “Trades, Labor, Operative, and Service” positions.  One might think Richmond would want more of those to deal with its maintenance problems.

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Finally, the totals.

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Looks like Petersburg is spending a lot of money on non-teachers.  Trouble is, it’s hard to know how Petersburg might usefully redirect some of those salary dollars, given that even the State Board of “Education” doesn’t know how to fix Petersburg’s broken school system.

Richmond’s count is near average and generally in line with (smaller, in some respects, than) the peer cities.