Dollars But Not Scholars, Yet Again

We have seen (here and here and here) that division expenditure does not correlate with division SOL pass rate.

Today we explore the relationship (if any) between average teacher salary and pass rate.

VDOE posts an annual report that includes the average classroom teacher salaries (regular K-12 education teachers, art, music, physical education, technology, remedial, gifted, mathematics, reading, special education, and ESL teachers; not included in the calculation are: teacher aides, guidance counselors or librarians) by division and school.

Here, for a start, are the 2016 average teacher salaries of the highest and lowest and several selected divisions.

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Richmond, it seems, is outspending both its peer, older city divisions and the neighboring counties. 

Maggie Walker (despite not being a “school”), looks like a real bargain.

VDOE will have the 2016 SOL scores in time for graduations this month but they won’t post them until August or September.  So we’ll have to be satisfied with the 2015 pass rates.  Here are the averages of the division pass rates on the reading, writing, math, science, and history & social science tests.

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Richmond is the gold square.  The red diamonds are, from the left, Hampton, Norfolk, and Newport News.  The green diamonds are, from the top, Hanover, Chesterfield, Henrico, and Charles City (partially obscured, just above Hampton).  Lynchburg is the blue diamond.

You can decide for yourself what kind of return Richmond is getting on our money.

As you see, the computer is glad to fit a curve to these data but the correlation is nil (R2 = 1.3%).

Turning to the Richmond elementary schools, we see:

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That 18% correlation looks to be driven in large part by expensive Munford (over at the right) and inexpensive, lousy scoring Woodville (bottom, left).  Note that the high scorer, Carver, is not all that expensive.

The state data still have not caught up with the Elkhardt/Thompson situation.  Here are the other middle schools

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R2 is only 3.2%.  The low point there is MLK.

As to the high schools, it looks like we have a 34% correlation with salary

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until we take out Community and Open, which restricts the analysis to the general population high schools + Franklin Military.

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The low score there is Armstrong.  The expensive school is Huguenot.

Here are the data.

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Of course, SOL scores depend on the economic status of the students as well as upon the quality of the teaching.  VDOE has student growth percentile (“SGP”) data that are not dependent on economic status but they have been sequestering those results.  Brian Davison has pried loose some of the data by division.  We’ll see if his recent victory court will make the SGP data available by school and by teacher.